Jute is a long, soft, shiny vegetable fibre that can be spun into coarse, strong threads. It is produced from plants family. Jute is one of the cheapest natural fibres and is second only to cotton in amount produced and variety of uses. The industrial term for jute fibre is raw jute. The fibres are off-white to brown, and 1–4 meters long. Jute fibre is often called hessian, jute fabrics are also called hessian cloth and jute sacks are called gunny bags in some European countries. The fabric made from jute is popularly known as burlap in North America. Jute has been cultivated in India since ancient times. The Indian jute industry, in turn, was modernized during the British Rule in India. Jute is the second most important vegetable fibre after cotton; not only for cultivation, but also for various uses. Jute is used chiefly to make cloth for wrapping bales of raw cotton, and to make sacks and coarse cloth. The fibres also woven into curtains, chair coverings, carpets, area rugs, hessian cloth, and backing and also used for making shopping bags. Diversified jute products are becoming more valuable to the consumer today. Among these are espadrilles, floor coverings, home textiles, high performance technical textiles, Geotextiles, composites, and bags. Jute is 100 % biodegradable.

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